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CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The West Virginia Coal Forum is cheered by news that First Energy will be keeping the Pleasants Power Station at Willow Island in operation for the next several years.

“This is incredible news, and we are so grateful to the efforts by First Energy and Gov. Jim Justice to keep this facility in operation,” said Coal Forum Co-chairman Chris Hamilton. 

The West Virginia Coal Forum is an organization representing business and labor in the coal industry.

DATE: OCTOBER 23 AND 24

WHERE: RUNNING RIGHT ACADEMY 
431 Running Right Way, Julian, WV 25529

TIME: 9-4:30, LUNCH IS PROVIDED

Dealing with the after-effects of a mining accident can be difficult, stressful, sometime disabling.

For every person physically affected by an accident, there are sometime two or three who are emotionally affected in way that makes continuing to work mentally and emotionally challenging and sometimes almost impossible.

Just as physically First Aid is applied for those affected by an accident, Psychological First Aid can also be applied for this who witnessed and tried to help. Psychological First Aid applied early, can reduce the mental and emotional impact of stress reactions on good people caught in a bad situation.

Psychological First Aid (CISM) for Mine HR and Safety Teams is a two day training in understanding Critical Incident Stress Management and individual interventions that can be applied by Mine Safety Teams and HR Personnel within the first three weeks after an accident to help mine team members deal with natural stress reactions.

This two day training will cover:

  • Understanding Stress Reactions
  • The Stages of Stress response
  • How to help effectively during and after a Critical Incident
  • The ways prayer and pastoral comfort can help

This is the basic 13 hours certificate course in CISM  "Assisting Individuals in Crisis"

The course will be taught by ICISF approved trainer, Sky Kershner.  Sky has provided support to WV miners after accidents for over twenty years. 

More information on the course at: https://icisf.org/individual-crisis-intervention-and-peer-support/

 

As the coal industry continues to rebound, its overall contribution to West Virginia’s economy is nothing short of phenomenal, supporting upwards of 17 percent of the state’s total GDP.

According to John Deskins, director of the West Virginia University Bureau of Business and Economic Research, the coal industry and coal-fired power generates a total of $13 billion in overall economic activity in West Virginia. For context, total economic output for the state as measured by gross domestic product (GDP) was around $77 billion in 2017.

According to Deskins’ newest report, “The Economic Impact of Coal in West Virginia Economy,” which was commissioned by the West Virginia Coal Forum, the coal industry currently employs more than 13,000 miners who on average make $85,000 yearly (twice the average in-state salary) and conservatively support another 25,000 jobs throughout our state. Add in the 2,800 coal-fired power plant and utility workers, and you have a $2.5 billion payroll. 

West Virginia’s 100-plus mining operations purchase local supplies, use local contractors and employ a highly complex, technologically advanced loading, handling and transportation system that safely transports base fuel for electric generation and steel production throughout the world.

Total payout for these skilled tasks equates another $6.5 billion annually.

And as it relates to taxes, West Virginia coal contributes a whopping $652 million in overall tax contributions to state and county governments.

Accounting for about 50 percent of all state exports, West Virginia coal is shipped to at least 47 foreign destinations. West Virginia is the leading export state and accounts for upwards of 40 percent of all U.S. coal exports to markets in China, India, Brazil and the European nations.

Most are aware that West Virginia has two major types of coal: steam/thermal coal which is consumed to produce electricity, and metallurgical coal which is relied upon to produce steel. West Virginia has vast reserves of high-grade “met” coal.

While solar, natural gas, nuclear and wind can compete with steam coal to produce electricity, the steel industry requires met coal for the coking process that is part of steel production. There are no substitutes, and West Virginia has more high quality met coal than anyone else, which is why we are currently shipping it around the world.

Even better, volumes of steam coal exports from West Virginia also are on the rise as international demand for coal increases because of its low cost and reliability for electric power generation.

Simply stated, more steel and power is needed to support and sustain the growth we are seeing across the globe as more developing nations grow their economies and infrastructure.

West Virginia coal always has maintained a healthy share in the international marketplace. And the infrastructure is in place to accommodate rising world demand.

World reliance on West Virginia coal should help stabilize this industry for years to come as we continue to make progress with domestic policy and increased production. This underscores coal’s amazing comeback and importance to our state in the past, present and future.

Hearing coal trains, seeing miners going to work and watching full coal barges travel our rivers not only signals coal’s recovery, but also rings as a stark reminder that the beast behind West Virginia’s economic health is ever so present. West Virginia must continue to keep coal in the center of our plans for economic diversification and growth.

 Chris Hamilton is co-chair of the West Virginia Coal Forum, an organization representing business and labor in the coal industry. 

CHARLESTON, W.Va. A new study on the economic impact of West Virginia’s coal industry shows that even when facing the worst regulatory pressures in history, mining still generated nearly $13 billion in economic activity for the Mountain State.

“Coal and coal-fired electric power always has been a major driver behind West Virginia’s economy, and this study proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that not only is coal the bedrock of our economy, it’s a key component of our future,” said Coal Forum Co-chairman Chris Hamilton. “The 2017 figures show that our industry is rebounding from the years of oppression during the previous administration.”

The study, “Economic Impact of Coal in West Virginia Economy,” was commissioned by the West Virginia Coal Forum and conducted by the West Virginia University Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER). It shows that coal mining spends more than $1.1 billion on wages alone, and coal operators spent roughly $6.5 billion in 2017, far more than the entire general revenue of state government.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The West Virginia Coal Forum is applauding plans from President Donald Trump and Gov. Jim Justice to save West Virginia coal jobs by taking immediate steps to ensure the long-term operational viability of American coal-fired power plants.

“Without question, this is the best news in my 40-year career in the coal industry,” said Coal Forum Co-chairman Chris Hamilton. “It’s bigger than big. Never before in the history of mining has our state and federal political leadership been able to achieve the benefits to coal that are embodied in the Trump-Justice plan.”

The West Virginia Coal Forum is an organization representing business and labor in the coal industry.